How holding your nose can increase your risk of Alzheimer’s disease


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Don’t go looking for gold in your golden years.

New research suggests that blowing your nose may increase the risk of Alzheimer’s disease and associated dementia.

The bacteria can travel through the nasal cavity’s olfactory nerve — simplified by a pickaxe — to reach the brain and create markers of an “Alzheimer’s disease telltale sign,” According to scientists from Australia’s Griffith University.

Specifically, their study, published in Scientific Reports, noted bacteria chlamydia pneumoniae – A germ associated with respiratory infections including pneumonia – Use the olfactory nerve as an “invasion pathway to attack the central nervous system”. Then cells in the brain responded to the attack by depositing the protein beta-amyloid, a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease.

A new study has found that picking your nose may be linked to dementia.
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We are the first to show that chlamydia pneumoniae It can go directly to the nose and into the brain where it can cause Alzheimer’s-like diseases,” Professor James St. John, co-author of the study and chair of the Clem Jones Center for Neurobiology and Stem Cell Research, said in a press release.

While conducting the study in mice, St. John said, “The evidence may be frightening for humans as well.”

The olfactory nerve acts as a highway for bacteria to reach the brain as it bypasses the blood-brain barrier, according to the researchers. The next stage of the research, they said, aims to prove the same pathway exists in humans.

“We need to do this study in humans and see if the same pathway works in the same way. It’s research that has been suggested by many people, but is not yet complete,” St. John said.

Scientific research has examined the links between nose picking and dementia.
Scientific research has examined the links between nose picking and dementia.
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“What we do know is that these same bacteria are in humans, but we haven’t determined how they got there.”

St. John and his team note that a loss of smell can be an early sign of Alzheimer’s disease and suggest smell tests for those aged 60 and over as an early detection tool.

“Once you’re over 65, your risk factor goes up right, but we’re also looking for other causes, because it’s not just age – it’s environmental exposure as well. And we think bacteria and viruses are critical.”

A new study has found that harmful bacteria can get into your brain by biting your nose.
A new study has found that harmful bacteria can get into your brain by biting your nose.
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The professor also provided some valuable guidance on how to protect yourself from nasal-related nervous distress.

Picking your nose and plucking the hair from your nose is not a good idea… We don’t want to damage the inside of our nose and plucking and plucking can lead to it.

“If you damage the lining of the nose, you can increase the number of bacteria that can get into your brain.”

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