Watch the last total lunar eclipse until 2025 on November 8


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You’re about to get your last chance to view a file total lunar eclipse For some time. NASA indicated that the last such eclipse until March 2025 begins in the early hours of the morning of November 8 in North America. You can also get a glimpse of parts of Asia, Australia, New Zealand and South America. The partial eclipse will begin at 4:09 a.m. ET, and the total eclipse will last from 4:16 a.m. until 5:42 a.m. The final partial stage will end at 6:49 AM. Those on the East Coast of the United States will miss some or all of that last bit as the moon sets. However, you may not have to go outside if it’s too cold – there are ways to watch from the warmth of the house.

Live broadcasts will be available. Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona Will offer Multiple telescopic views of the total lunar eclipse starting at 4 a.m.E. Timeanddate.com will have a streams In multiple cities, including its own view from Roswell and New Mexico as well as forages from San Diego and Perth in Australia. Virtual telescope project also provide International coverage.

You’ll want to take a look even if 2025 isn’t too far away. A total lunar eclipse (where the Earth lies directly between the moon and the sun) earns the nickname “blood moon” because of optical tricks that paint the moon’s surface a dramatic red. When blue light of short wavelength tends to get stuck in particles of Earth’s atmosphere, the longer wavelengths of red, orange and yellow help them complete the cosmic journey. It is an amazing effect that you can see with the naked eye. And if you have a telescope, you might find out Uranus in the distance.

There will be a partial lunar eclipse during the period. The first visual show in the Americas will take place on October 28, 2023, with further events scheduled for March 25 and September 18 of the following year. You’re not entirely out of luck, then, even if these events aren’t very attractive.

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